Tutorials

Software Engineering Education in Co-located Multi-User Eye-Tracking-Environments

TPM: Using Experiential Learning to Support Accessibility in Computing Education

Experiential Learning for Software Engineering Using Agile Modeling in Umple

A Gamification Toolset for Improving Engagement of Students in Software Engineering Courses


Software Engineering Education in Co-located Multi-User Eye-Tracking-Environments

Organizers: Hans Gruber, Christian Wolff, Jürgen Mottok

This tutorial explores the application of Eye-Tracking technology for Software Engineering education. We show a research gap concerning its usage for real- time improvement of traditional learning scenarios and outline a number of activities to generate research ideas and prototypical solutions to close this gap. We describe our expertise as active researchers in the relevant fields and propose a possible format to document the outcomes of this workshop for further studies.


TPM: Using Experiential Learning to Support Accessibility in Computing Education

Organizers: Samuel Malachowsky and Daniel E. Krutz

This tutorial will introduce our Accessibility Learning Labs (ALL). The objectives of this collaborative project with The National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) are to both inform participants about foundational topics in accessibility and to demonstrate the importance of creating accessible software. The labs enable easy classroom inclusion by providing instructors all necessary materials including lecture and activity slides and videos. Each lab addresses an accessibility issue and contains:

  1. Relevant background information on the examined issue
  2. An example web-based application containing the accessibility problem
  3. A process to emulate this accessibility problem
  4. Details about how to repair the problem from a technical perspective
  5. Incidents from people who encountered this accessibility issue and how it has impacted their life.

The labs may be easily integrated into a wide variety of curriculum at high schools (9-12), and in undergraduate and graduate courses. The labs will be easily adoptable due to their self-contained nature and their inclusion of all necessary instructional material (e.g., slides, quizzes, etc.). No special software is required to use any portion of the labs since they are web-based and are able to run on any computer with a reasonably recent web browser. There are currently four available labs on the topics of: Colorblindness, Hearing, Blindness and Dexterity.

Material is available on our website: http://all.rit.edu

This tutorial will provide an overview of the created labs and usage instructions and information for adaptors.


Experiential Learning for Software Engineering Using Agile Modeling in Umple

Organizers: Timothy C. Lethbridge

In this tutorial we will discuss a method of teaching a variety of software engineering topics in an integrated and experiential manner. Topics covered include agile processes, software modeling, open source development tools and processes, code generation and testing. Our approach involves using a textual modeling language called Umple that enables agile, model-driven, test-driven development. Students are introduced to this tool in an introduction to software engineering course, where they learn the basics of the above topics. Then in their capstone course they are able to actually contribute to the tool itself.


A Gamification Toolset for Improving Engagement of Students in Software Engineering Courses

Organizers: Tanja E.J. Vos, Gordon Fraser, Ivan Martinez-Ortiz, Rui Prada, António Rito Silva, and I.S.W.B. Prasetya

Few if any would dispute that educating software engineering is a challenging endeavour. Although programming and creating new artefacts can motivate the creativity of students. Other software engineering topics (like e.g. requirement specifications and testing) are not considered very exciting by students. However, these topics are important to develop quality software and insufficient knowledge of students – Europe’s future software engineers – in the long run contributes to failing software. The EU Erasmus+ project IMPRESS was set to explore the use of gamification in educating software engineering at the university level. The objective has been to develop a toolset that can help to improve students’ engagement, and hence their appreciation, for the taught subjects like software testing and specifications. This tutorial will guide participants through the set of tools developed by the project and introduce how they can use them to improve students’ engagement.